Syllabus

The AQA A Level Physics specification is structured into thirteen topics, assessed across three examinations. Some of the content is compulsory, and some is optional. If content is listed as optional it means that students will have a choice of questions relating to these topics when they sit their exam. Your tutor may advise that you focus on a particular one of these topics when studying:

Compulsory Content:

Optional Content

AQA A Level in Biology: *AQA Qualification Code: 7408

In order to attain this qualification you must sit three examinations and twelve practical assessments. The practicals are not marked, but you will need to be observed by an examination centre to demonstrate competence in the different techniques. The practicals are usually held in Spring of each year, while the written exams are in May/June. Booking exams is the responsibility of the student. Any and all exam fees will be paid by the student directly to their chosen exam centre. Finding an exam centre that will allow private candidates to sit practical exams can be difficult, and students should be prepared to travel. On purchasing the course we can provide students with a list of recommended exam centres.

Paper 1

Assessment details:

What is assessed?:

Questions:

Paper 2

Assessment details:

What is assessed?:

Questions:

Paper 3

Assessment details:

What is assessed?:

Questions:

Practical Assessment

Your A Level grade will be based on your written examinations. However, in order to recieve your A Level you must also undergo a seperate endorsement of 12 practical skills. These are listed below:

  1. Investigation into the variation of the frequency of stationary waves on a string with length, tension and mass per unit length of the string.
  2. Investigation of interference effects to include the Young’s slit experiment and interference by a diffraction grating.
  3. Determination of by a free-fall method
  4. Determination of the Young modulus by a simple method.
  5. Determination of resistivity of a wire using a micrometer, ammeter and voltmeter.
  6. Investigation of the emf and internal resistance of electric cells and batteries by measuring the variation of the terminal pd of the cell with current in it.
  7. Investigation into simple harmonic motion using a mass-spring system and a simple pendulum.
  8. Investigation of Boyle’s (constant temperature) law and Charles’s (constant pressure) law for a gas.
  9. Investigation of the charge and discharge of capacitors. Analysis techniques should include log-linear plotting leading to a determination of the time constant
  10. Investigate how the force on a wire varies with flux density, current and length of wire using a top pan balance.
  11. Investigate, using a search coil and oscilloscope, the effect on magnetic flux linkage of varying the angle between a search coil and magnetic field direction.
  12. Investigation of the inverse-square law for gamma radiation.